« Only nuclear advocates would work so hard to hurt themselves | Main | »

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a011570a7a11d970b01348023c1ca970c

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Five myths about green energy:

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

The article mentions that batteries are about 80 times less energy dense than gasoline.

See here:
http://www.anengineerindc.com/2010/04/energy-density-is-double-edged-sword.html
for some other interesting anecdotes about the differences in energy density between batteries and a standard gallon of fuel -- and the known hazards of high energy-density batteries.

And that doesn't even mention the additional energy density (safely) provided by nuclear power.

The comments section is also very enlightening, in an effort to better understand everyone's perspectives. Like Sun Tzu suggested, know your enemies as well as yourself.

I am in favor of nuclear energy since I believe that it is the only energy source that can adequately provide for the needs of large industrialized countries. I also believe that all the safety problems have been solved or can be solved. However, the Washington Post article contains a number of misleading statements:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/04/23/AR2010042302220.html?referrer=emailarticle

According to the article, electric cars and wind turbines depend on neodymium, a rare earth metal on which China has a near monopoly. That is simply false and indicates that the writers did a poor job of research. The fact is that the Tesla elecctric car has an induction motor which does not use neodymium. Electric and hybrid cars can use induction motors, or they can use variable switch reluctance motors, neither of which use neodymium. Moreover, wind turbines do not need neodymium. So far as I know, the only wind turbines which use neodymium use direct drive generators. The wind turbines which use gearing to run the generator at a higher speed do not need neodymium.

Moreover, China cannot maintain its near monopoly on neodymium. There are other sources that can be developed.

The article also states that batteries for electric cars are unreliable, finicky, and have short lives. Not true! As the article states, a limiting factor for electric cars is that 40% of potential owners do not have access to an outlet capable of recharging them. That may be true, but what about the 60% who DO have access to an adequate outlet? Moreover, more outlets could be provided as the need increases.

The article is correct that wind and solar power are not practical sources of power and provides reasons. However, there is at least one exception: In places where connecting to the grid is impractical, they may be the best available choice of power.

It seems odd that the author fails to mention an alternative power source for vehicles. It should be obvious that we cannot use oil forever. Nor does he mention nuclear power as an alternative to fossil fuels.

Although the article does contain some accurate statements, it smacks of being written by an author who has very limited knowledge of the subject and is simply listing misleading information that has been spoon fed to him.

The article is correct that wind and solar power are not practical sources of power and provides reasons. However, there is at least one exception: In places where connecting to the grid is impractical, they may be the best available choice of power.
_____________
Steven

It's so nice to have you do all of the research for us. It makes our decision making so much easier!! Thanks.

It's so nice to have you do all of the research for us. It makes our decision making so much easier!! Thanks.

This China scare is getting out of control. No, transitioning to electric cars won't put the entire world under the mercy of China's rare metals. The writer should do more research.

Nice little cup of life, protection of the environment so they can make a lot of contribution! Cool!

Thanks for that article it really raises some interesting points. contrary to the opinion of the author, electric car batteries do have a long way to go

Thank you for the share. This is very informative and uselful.

The comments to this entry are closed.