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The first figure below shows EPA’s basis for its conclusions. The tall vertical lines show the uncertainty of each of the data points. The second graph shows Cohen’s data, with much less uncertainty because of the large amount of data he amassed. EPA's data is miners; Cohen's is people in their homes. Which data do you find most convincing?

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good share!with much less uncertainty because of the large amount of data he amassed.

The second graph shows Cohen’s data, with much less uncertainty because of the large amount of data he amassed.

So Otto Raabe gives us a solid population of radium dial painters whose individual body burdens of radium has been measured.

We may find circumstances under which irradiated people – perhaps lots of them – are injured by radiation. So the prudent course

I find it hard to go by what is presented in just a few scientific studies nowadays. We have seen enough cases of studies that give very different results to move cautiously when it comes to data.

Proper statistical analysis would have to use data gleaned from more extensive research. When the health and safety of human beings is at risk, we cannot be so dismissive, or rush to state conclusions that have a commercial benefit.


Das ist der richtige Blog für alle, die suchen ausverkauft zu diesem Thema muss.

A teenage girl had been talking on the phone for about half an hour, and then she hung up.
  "Wow!," said her father, "That was short. You usually talk for two hours. What happened?"
  
  "Wrong number," replied the girl.

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